What

not


to


do
It
is


not


reasonable


to


produce

and

sell


channel


catfish


from

the


same


pond.


Usually,

fish

are


purchased

from
outside

sources


or


raised


in


other


ponds.


Attempting


to


raise

channel


catfish


in


ponds


open


to


fishing


results
in

the


ponds


being


open


for


only


a

few

months


of


the


year;


a

large


number


of


small


fish

that


are


unacceptable
to

the


customer;


and

fishermen


returning


a

large


number


of


stressed


fish

that


die


or


learn


hook

avoidance.
Stocking
densities
Stocking

densities


vary


from

a

few

hundred

to


over


8,000


pounds


per


acre.


Higher


stocking

densities


do

not
necessarily

mean


higher


catch


rates,


but


are


related

to


potential


water


quality


problems,


such

as

decreased
dissolved
oxygen.


If

the


weight


of


channel


catfish


in


a

pond


exceeds


1,500


pounds


per


surface


acre,


aeration
equipment

should


be

available.


If

stocking

densities


exceed


about


3,000


pounds


per


surface


acre,


aeration

is
a
necessity.
Catch

rates
Catch
rates


in


fee


fishing


ponds


appear

to


be

related

to


time


exposed


to


angling.


In


recently


opened


ponds
stocked

with


fish

that


have

not


been


exposed


to


angling,


catch


rates


are


very


high,


often


over


five

fish

per
angler

hour.


Typically,


within

a

few

days

catch


rates


decline

to


less


than


one

fish

per


angler


hour.


This
suggests

it

may


be

more


desirable

in


fee


fishing


ponds


to


frequently


replace


fish

rather

than


attempt


to


carry
high

densities.
Replacement
programs
Four
replacement


programs


are


commonly

used:
replacement

of


fish

caught
replacement

based


on

number


of


customers

or


receipts
regular
scheduled

replacement
seasonal

(weather


or


holiday

related)


replacement.
Individual

operators


will


have

to


determine


the


best


replacement


program

for


a

particular

facility.

More
frequent

replacement


requires

considerable

time


for


scheduling


and

more


meticulous


record


keeping.


The
most

efficient


and

profitable

fee


fishing


operations

are


those


that


move


the


maximum


pounds


of


fish

in


the
minimum
time


with


the


least


obligation


of


limited


resources.


Frequent


replacement


in


a

relatively


small


pond
containing
a

moderate


density

of


fish

has

the


potential


of


the


most


return

on

investment.
Channel

catfish


in


fee


fishing


ponds


usually

are


fed


only


a

maintenance


diet.


Few


operators


attempt


to
promote
fish

growth


in


the


pond.


Fish


are


fed


1

to


2

percent


of


the


estimated


weight


of


fish

in


the


pond,


two

or
three

times


per


week.


A

commercial


catfish


ration


is


usually

fed.


Marketing


Other


Species
Other

fish

such

as

rainbow


trout


or


hybrid


striped


bass

are


marketed

through


fee


fishing


facilities.


Rainbow
trout

require

an

abundant


supply


of


high


quality


cool


water.


Trout


fee


fishing


operations

generally

are


limited
to

locations


at


which

summer

water


temperatures


do

not


exceed


70°


F.


General

operating

procedures


at


trout
fee

fishing


facilities

are


similar


to


those


described


for


catfish.


Because


of


increasing

demands

for


high


quality
water

and

restrictive


water


use

regulations,


it

is


difficult


to


locate

or


purchase

undeveloped


sites

appropriate
for

trout


fee


fishing


operations.