Wen—Goldfish

have

a

fancy


tail,

e.g.,


Fantails


and

Veiltails


("Wen"


is


also


the


name


of


the


characteristic
headgrowth

on

such

strains


as

Oranda


and

Lionhead)
Dragon

Eye—Goldfish


have

extended

eyes,


e.g.


Black


Moor,

Bubble

Eye,


and

Telescope

Eye
Egg—Goldfish

have

no

a

dorsal


fin,


and

usually

have

an

'egg-

shaped'


body,


e.g.


Lionhead

(note


that


a
Bubble
Eye


without


a

dorsal


fin

belongs


to


this

group)
Size
As
of


April


2008,


the


largest


goldfish


in


the


world


was


believed


by

the


BBC

to


measure


19

inches


(48


cm),


and
be
living


in


the


Netherlands.


At


the


time,


a

goldfish


named

"Goldie",


kept


as

a

pet


in


a

tank


in


Folkestone,
England,

was


measured


as

15

inches


(38


cm)


and

over


2

pounds


(0.91


kg),


and

named

as

the


second


largest
in

the


world


behind


the


Netherlands


fish.


The


secretary

of


the


Federation


of


British


Aquatic


Societies

(FBAS)
stated

of


Goldie's


size


that


"I


would

think

there


are


probably


a

few

bigger


goldfish


that


people


don't


think

of


as
record

holders,

perhaps

in


ornamental


lakes.


In


July


2010


a

goldfish


measuring

16

inches


(41


cm)


and
5
pounds


(2.3


kg)


was


caught


in


a

pond


in


Poole,


England,


thought


to


have

been


abandoned


there


after
outgrowing

a

tank.
In

ponds
Goldfish
are


popular


pond


fish,


since


they


are


small,


inexpensive,

colorful,


and

very


hardy.


In


an

outdoor


pond
or

water


garden,


they


may


even

survive

for


brief


periods


if

ice


forms

on

the


surface,

as

long


as

there


is


enough
oxygen

remaining


in


the


water


and

the


pond


does

not


freeze


solid.


Common

goldfish,


London


and

Bristol
shubunkins,

jikin,


wakin,


comet


and

some


hardier

fantail


goldfish


can

be

kept


in


a

pond


all


year


round

in
temperate

and

subtropical


climates.


Moor,

veiltail,

oranda

and

lionhead


can

be

kept


safely

in


outdoor


ponds
only

in


the


summer,


and

in


more


tropical


climates.
Small

to


large


ponds


are


fine

though

the


depth


should


be

at


least


80

centimeters

(31.5


in)

to


avoid


freezing.
During

winter,


goldfish


become

sluggish,


stop


eating,


and

often


stay


on

the


bottom

of


the


pond.


This


is
completely

normal;


they


become

active

again


in


the


spring.


A

filter


is


important


to


clear


waste

and

keep

the
pond

clean.


Plants


are


essential


as

they


act


as

part


of


the


filtration


system,


as

well


as

a

food


source


for


the
fish.

Plants


are


further


beneficial


since


they


raise

oxygen


levels

in


the


water.
Compatible
fish

include

rudd,


tench,


orfe


and

Koi,


but


the


latter


require

specialized


care.


Ramshorn

snails

are
helpful

by

eating


any

algae


that


grows

in


the


pond.


Without


some


form

of


animal


population

control,


goldfish
ponds

can

easily

become

overstocked.


Fish


such

as

orfe


consume

goldfish


eggs.
In

aquaria
Like

most


carp,


goldfish


produce

a

large


amount


of


waste

both


in


their


faeces


and

through


their


gills,


releasing
harmful

chemicals


into

the


water.


Build

-

up

of


this

waste

to


toxic

levels

can

occur


in


a

relatively


short


period


of
time,

and

can

easily

cause

a

goldfish's


death.


For

common


and

comet


varieties,


each

goldfish


should


have
about

20

US


gallons

(76


l;

17

imp

gal)


of


water.


Fancy


goldfish


(which


are


smaller)

should


have

about
10
US


gallons

(38


l;

8.3


imp

gal)


per


goldfish.


The


water


surface


area


determines


how


much


oxygen


diffuses
and
dissolves

into

the


water.


A

general


rule

is


have

1

square

foot


(0.093


m

2
).


Active


aeration

by

way


of


a
water

pump,


filter


or


fountain

reduces

the


minimum

surface


area.