and
white;"


kohaku


was


the


first


ornamental


variety


to


be

established

in


Japan


(late


19th


century).
Taisho

Sanshoku

(or


Taisho


Sanke)


Very

similar


to


the


Kohaku,


except


for


the


addition


of


small


black
markings
called

sumi|.


This


variety


was


first


exhibited


in


1914


by

the


Koi


breeder,


Gonzo


Hiroi,


during
the

reign


of


the


Taisho


Emperor.


In


America,


the


name


is


often


abbreviated


to


just

"Sanke".


The


kanji,
may

be

read


as

either

sanshoku


or


as

sanke.
Showa

Sanshoku

(or


Showa

Sanke)


A

black


Koi


with


red


(

hi

)


and

white


(

shiroji


)


markings.


The


first
Showa
Sanke


was


exhibited


in


1927,


during


the


reign


of


the


Showa

Emperor.


In


America,


the


name


is
often

abbreviated


to


just

Showa.


The


amount


of


shiroji


on

Showa

Sanke


has

increased


in


modern


times
(
Kindai


Showa

),


to


the


point


that


it

can

be

difficult


to


distinguish


from

Taisho


Sanke.


The


kanji,,


may


be
read

as

either


sanshoku


or


as

sanke.
Tancho

Any


Koi


with


a

solitary

red


patch


on

its

head.


The


fish

may


be

a

Tancho


Showa,


Tancho


Sanke,
or

even

Tancho


Goshiki.


Named


for


the


Japanese


crane


(

Grus

japonensis

)


which

also


has

a

red


spot


on
its
head.
Chagoi

lit
.

'Tea-

colored'


Koi


ranging


in


color


from

pale


olive-

drab


green

or


brown


to


copper

or


bronze
and
more


recently


darker,


subdued


orange

shades.


Famous

for


its

docile,


friendly


personality


and

large
size,
it

is


considered


s

sign


of


good


luck


among

Koi


keepers.
Asagi

A

Koi


that


is


light


blue


above


and

usually

red,


but


also


occasionally


pale


yellow


or


cream,
generally
below

the


lateral


line

and

on

the


cheeks.


The


Japanese


name


means


pale


greenish

-

blue,
spring

onion


colour,


or


indigo.


Sometime


incorrectly

written


as

(light


yellow).
Utsurimono

A

black


Koi


with


white,


red,


or


yellow


markings.


Zebra

colour.


The


oldest


attested

form

is
the

yellow


form,


called

"Black

and

white


markings"|Kuro


Ki


Han


in


the


19th


century,

but


renamed


Ki
Utsuri

by

Elizaburo

Hoshino,


an

early

20th


century


Koi


breeder.


The


red


and

white


versions


are


called

Hi
Utsuri

and

Shiro


Utsuri


respectively.

The


word

utsuri


means


to


print


(the


black


markings

are


reminiscent
of

ink


stains).


Genetically


the


same


as

Showa

but


lacking

either


red


pigment

(Shiro

Utsuri)


or


white
pigment
(Hi


Utsuri/Ki


Utsuri)
Bekko

A

white

-

,


red

-

,


or


yellow

-

skinned


Koi


with


black


markings

sumi.


The


Japanese


name


means
"tortoise

shell.


The


white

-


red

-


and

yellow


varieties


are


called

Shiro


Bekko


Aka


Bekko


and

Ki


Bekko
respectively.
May


be

confused

with


the


Utsuri.
Goshiki

A

dark


Koi


with


red


(Kohaku


style)


hi


pattern.


The


Japanese


name


means


"Five

Colours".
Appears

similar


to


an

Asagi


with


little


or


no

Hi


below

the


lateral


line

and

a

Kohaku


Hi


pattern

over
reticulated
(fishnet


pattern)


scales.


The


base

color


can

range

from

nearly


black


to


very


pale


sky

blue.
Shusui

The


Japanese


name


means


"Autumn

green."


The


Shusui

was


created


in


1910


by

Yoshigoro
Akiyama,

by

crossing


Japanese


Asagi


with


German

mirror


carp.


The


fish

has

no

scales,


except


for


a
single
line

of


large


mirror


scales


dorsally,


extending


from

head


to


tail.

The


most


common


type


of


Shusui
have
a

pale,


sky-

blue/gray

(color)|gray


color


above


the


lateral


line

and

red


or


orange

(and


very,


very
rarely

bright


yellow)

below

the


lateral


line

and

on

the


cheeks.
Kinginrin

A

Koi


with


metallic


(glittering

metal

-

flake

appearing)


scales.


The


name


translates


into

English
as
"gold

and

silver


scales."


Often


abbreviated


to


Ginrin.


There

are


Ginrin

versions


of


almost


all


other
varieties

of


Koi,


and

they


are


fashionable.


Gin-

rin

refers

to


sparlking,


glittering


scales


as

opposed


to


the
smooth,
even

metallic


skin


and

scales


seen

in


the


Ogon


varieties.


Recently


these


characteristics


have