forum
you

can

become

self-

sufficient


and

travel


to


the


grocery


store


less


and

lower


your


food


bills


all


at


the
same

time.
WHAT
DO

I


DO

TO

GET

STARTED
You

must


study,


study,


study


and

follow

the


information


in


the


following


pages


until


you

become

your


very


own
Aquaponics

expert


enabling


you

to


take


care


of


you

and

yours!
Understanding

Hydroponics
The

next


topic

to


cover


is


Hydroponics

as

it

is


of


the


utmost


importance


in


understanding


how


one

half


of


an
Aquaponics

system

works.

Hydroponics
Hydroponics
is


a

method


of


growing


plants

using


mineral


nutrient


solutions,


in


water,


without


soil


Terrestrial
plants
may


be

grown


with


their


roots


in


the


mineral


nutrient


solution


only


or


in


an

inert


medium,


such

as
perlite,

gravel,


mineral


wool,


or


coconut


husk.
Researchers
discovered


in


the


19th


century


that


plants

absorb

essential


mineral


nutrients


as

inorganic

ions


in
water.

In


natural

conditions,


soil


acts


as

a

mineral


nutrient


reservoir


but


the


soil


itself

is


not


essential


to


plant
growth.

When

the


mineral


nutrients


in


the


soil


dissolve

in


water,


plant


roots


are


able


to


absorb

them.


When

the
required
mineral


nutrients


are


introduced

into

a

plant's

water


supply


artificially,


soil


is


no

longer


required

for


the
plant

to


thrive.


Almost

any

terrestrial


plant


will


grow

with


hydroponics.


Hydroponics

is


also


a
standard
technique

in


biology

research


and

teaching.
Soilless

culture
Billions
of


container

plants

are


produced

annually,


including


fruit,


shade


and

ornamental


trees,


shrubs,


forest
seedlings,

vegetable


seedlings,


bedding

plants,


herbaceous


perennials

and

vines.


Most


container

plants

are
produced
in


soilless


media,


representing

soilless


culture.


However,


most


are


not


hydroponics


because


the
soilless

medium

often


provides


some


of


the


mineral


nutrients


via


slow


release


fertilizers,


cation

exchange


and
decomposition

of


the


organic


medium

itself.


Most


soilless


media


for


container

plants

also


contain


organic
materials
such

as

peat


or


composted


bark,


which

provide


some


nitrogen

to


the


plant.


Greenhouse


growth


of
plants
in


peat


bags

is


often


termed

hydroponics,


but


technically

it

is


not


because


the


medium

provides


some


of